Augustus A. Mechling Collection

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Augustus A. Mechling
Major, United States Army, Civil War 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania 
Wife: Susan 
Children: Jonas Henry, Edward A. and Lizzie Mechling 
Correspondence


Date Span: 1861~ -1917

Size: .5 cubic feet

Location: Archives 


Box 1


Item   1:  Letter to wife, April 5, 1865, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Informing her Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia had been captured by the Union Army, and that he would be home in a week.


Item   2 :  Letter to friend ???, March 26, 1863, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Reporting the successful capture of Fort Stedman by the Confederate Army and the successful recapture of Fort Stedman by the Union Army as well as listing the names of the Union casualties.


Item   3:  Letter to brother, September, 18??, from ?. 
Re: The letter is illegible.


Item   4:  Letter to wife, March 25, 1865, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Describes surprise Confederate attack on a fort; number of Confederate prisoners taken; writes of coming home soon, his poor health and seeing "Old Abe" and General Grant.


Item   5:  Official letter from Head-Quarters, Army of the Potomac, February 20, 1865. 
Re: Listing one dishonorable discharge and two orders to assignment. 
Official letter from Head-Quarters, Third Div., Ninth Army Corps, March 25, 1865. 
Re: Congratulating the men and officers for recapturing Fort Stedman. 
Official letter from Head-Quarters, Ninth Army Corps, March 26, 1865. 
Re: Congratulating the men and officers for successfully defending Fort Stedman.


Item   6:  Letter to wife, March 30, 1865, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Informing her he still has not received the certificate from Washington that would allow him to return home. 


Item   7:  Letter to friend ???, November 23, 1864, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Describing various battles of the Civil War.


Item   8:  Letter to A. A. Mechling, January 16, 1864, from ?. 
Re: Describing events of the Civil War.


Item   9:  Three envelopes addressed to Susanna Mechling in Greensburg, PA, A. A. Mechling, Louisville, KY, and a Western Union Telegraph to J. H. Mechling.


Item 10:  Letter to Brother Gust, January 3, 1861, from ?. 
Re: Inquiring of his health, conditions of the camp, how to send him tobacco, the weather, etc.


Item 11:  Letter to Friend Mechling, July 15, 1864, unsigned. 
Re: Describes battles of the Civil War.


Item 12:  Letter to Gust, March 31, 1864, from Geo. D. Allshouse. 
Re: Describing the weather and inquiring about his health and family.


Item 13:  Letter to Major Caldwell, January 17, 1864, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Requesting information on how to get an ill soldier discharged.


Item 14:  Letter to A. A. Mechling, January 23, 1864, from ?. 
Re: Informing him the proper way for an ill soldier to be discharged.


Item 15:  Letter to Father, November 29, 1864, from Edward Mechling. 
Re: A. A. Mechling's son writing to tell him he was well and requesting he bring him a dog and sword, and informing him of life at home. 
Letter to Father, October 16, 1864, from Ed Mechling. 
Re: Making many requests of gifts to bring him such as a dog, sword, horse, Christmas gifts, etc.


Item 16:  Six letters, September-December, 1864. 
Re: one letter is from the War Department concerning mustering troops; five letters from the U. S. Assistant Adjutant General concerning orders and assignments.


Item 17:  Various letters to and from A. A. Mechling that have missing pages.  


Item 18:  Letters to A. A. Mechling, 186?, from his children. 
Re: Requesting gifts and that he come home soon.


Item 19:  Letter to Dear Brother, January 8, 1862, from his sister Lizzie. 
Re: Writes of butchering hogs, some problems at home as well as telling him his family is doing well except for Jonas.


Item 20:  Letter to Dear Son, January 8, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: Assuring him his family was well and Jonas was improving, and to conduct himself honorable as many were not.


Item 21:  Letter to Dear Wife, January 9, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Informing her he was well, he was pleased to have a good wife and children, and listing some gifts he had for them. 


Item 22:  Letter to Dear Husband, January 17, 1862, from Susan. 
Re: Since he had not received her letters she believes they were stolen. A petition was being circulated to have Arters removed from the Post Office. Jonas is well but weak.


Item 23:  Letter to Dear Brother, January 19, 1862, from sister Lizzie. 
Re: Informing him his family was well, his wife was concerned he was taking something for sleep, and news from home such as a marriage, etc.


Item 24:  Letter to Dear Father, January 26, 1862, from Jonas Henry Mechling. 
Re: In his father he will go to school as soon as he is well and that he does everything his mother requests, but Ed and Lizzie do not. He is visiting his grandfather and wishes he could come home. 
Letter to Dear Brother, January 26, 1862, from Amanda. 
Re: Writing she is glad he likes camp life and she would like to see him.


Item 25 :  Letter to Dear Brother and Dear Son, January 26, 1862, from sister Lizzie and Mother. 
Re: In him his children are visiting and it is Jonas's first visit since he had the fever; asking him to stay out of battles as long as possible; pleased he is comfortable in his tent and that he is well.


Item 26:  Letter to Dear Brother, February 9, 1862, from Lizzie. 
Re: Lizzie is writing for his wife, Susan, saying she had gotten $.25 worth of stamps and paper from Arters. Also she would be getting coal , and corn and oats for the pigs.


Item 27:  Letter to Dear Brother, February 17, 1862, from Lizzie. 
Re: Received his letter and they are all looking forward to seeing him in ten days. Susan is better from her cold, but is worried that his orders are sending him to Kentucky.


Item 28:  Letter to A. A. Mechling, February 19, 1862, from ?. 
Re: Illegible but it seems to be about a debt owned.


Item 29:  Letter to Dear Wife, February 25, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He is on a boat and there are over 100,000 of us on the river. He has seen hundreds of Confederate prisoners including a general. He writes from Evansville, Indiana.


Item 30:  This seems to be two letters to his wife and one to cousins, May, 1862. 
Re: Assuring Susan, his wife, not to worry about him.  These are difficult to read.


Item 31:  Letter to Dear Wife, May 13, 1862, unsigned but it is A. A. Mechling. 
He is in Corinth, MS. The weather is hot; he has seen a garden with peas, etc. plus much fruit. He has heard a rumor that the Confederates refuse to fight and have been shot by their own for refusing to fight.


Item 32:  Letter to Dear Brother, May 13, 1862, from Brother Mechling.
Re: Sending him $5.00 and some stamps as requested and inquiring about the trophies he has collected.


Item 33:  Letter to Dear Wife, May 23, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Describes the fighting and the abandonment of Corinth by the Confederates. He describes the lush fruit.


Item 34:  Letter to Dear Wife, May 28, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Describes the fight with the loss of life of two or three Union soldiers and a few wounded; he and the men are tired; bids his children to be good and he has gifts for them. The dog he found had to be left in Nashville but he may still get him.


Item 35:  Letter to Dear Father, May 31, 1862, from Ed and Jonas. 
Re: Cautioning their father to not go too near the Rebels as they would take him prisoner. Ed was sorry the dog was lost but would also like a gun.


Item 36:  Letter to Dear Brother Gust, May 31, 1862, from his wife and sister Lizzie. 
Re: Grateful for his letters and glad he is comfortable in his tent. Susan has just finished baking and they wish he had some to eat; encourage him to get a honorable discharge and news from home.


Item 37:  Letter to Dear Wife, June 3, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: The weather is hot in Corinth; describes the fighting and states 50-60 Union soldiers killed and believes the time is near when all soldiers will be home.


Item 38:  Letter to Dear Wife, June 9, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is twenty miles south of Corinth, and he has never seen such lush fruit (apples, plums, cherries, blackberries as well as corn). He writes of poor treatment with no change of clothes or tents and inadequate care from the Doctors.


Item 39:  Letter to Dear Brother, June 10, 1862, from Brother Jonas. 
Re: Writes of his brother receiving a deserved commission; wishes he had the money for his fare to Pittsburg  which is $14. and  $11.10 from Cairo to Chicago; there are heavy Rebel losses.


Item 40:  Letter to Dear Wife, June 12, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Writes of 13 to 14 hundred Rebels surrendering without a fight and he believes he will start north soon; the soldiers brought the dog from Nashville.


Item 41:  Letter to Dear Brother, June 12, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: This letter is difficult to read; writes of A. A. Mechling getting a furlough and coming by way of Chicago; assures him his family is well and it makes his blood run cold to think about Union soldier's bodies being left to be eaten by worms. 


Item 42:  Letter to Dear Brother, June 22, 1862, from Bob, Lizzie and your affectionate wife. 
Re: The family is happy he is marching toward home; everything is growing nicely and all are well.

 

Item 43:  Letter to Dear Wife, June 14, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He is still located in Corinth but the President has ordered his regiment out of the field into quarters so he does not expect to fight anymore. They have taken between 10 and 15,000 Rebel prisoners and they are willing to take an oath of allegiance.


Item 44:  Letter to Thomas Rocher, June 24, 1862, from his wife Mary. 
Re: She fears for his life and in him they have a three day old son and she would like to name him after his father.  


Item 45:  Letter to his father, January 16, 1862, from Jonas Mechling. 
Re: He is well enough now to take his meals in the kitchen; the cow has not had her calf yet and the hay is nearly gone.  


Item 46:  Letter to Dear Wife, January 29, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He weighs 163 pounds now and he weighed 149 pounds when he entered so soldiering agrees with him.  He tells her how much he enjoyed the food she sent.


Item 47:  Letter to his father, January 30, 1862, from Jonas Henry Mechling.  
Re: I am well and running about; his grandmother has a bad cold and he wishes his father would answer his letters.


Item 48:  Letter to his wife, February 15, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: You may look for me home in a week or 10 days.


Item 49:  Letter to Dear Wife, March 2, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He writes from Nashville, TN, the finest place he has ever seen and would like to live there; The Rebels are retreating and throwing their guns and cannons into the river; there is a terrible flood; he has not heard from home in 3 weeks; in the last battle they killed 800 Rebels and took 15,000 prisoners.


Item 50:  Letter to Dear Wife, March 9, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He still has no mail and is very lonely; they are sending by boat confiscated Rebel property; he longs to hear how the Eastern Army is doing; he lives on coffee, pork and hard crackers taken from the Rebels; dried beef is too expensive to buy at $1.25 for 5-6 pounds



 

Box 2


Item 51:  Letter to Dear Wife, March 11, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Had a skirmish with Texas Rangers who are there to rob; there is no meat to eat except the salty ham; the Texas Rangers took 7 Union soldiers as prisoners.


Item 52:  Letter to Dear Wife, March 13, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Believes the war will soon be over; there are more bad men in the Union army than good; the officers are often bad; he is still in Nashville and they seldom see cows, sheep and other farm animals as they were killed to feed the Rebel soldiers.


Item 53:  Letter to Dear Wife, March 16, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: There is no sugar and butter is $.75 per pound, and he has collected 4 blankets that feel good on cool nights.


Item 54:  Letter to Dear Wife, April 19, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He has just returned from two days on Picket Duty with one day rations, no blankets and it rained the entire time; find Rebel bodies and march by them; describes battles.


Item 55:  Letter to Dear Son, May 3, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: His father prays for his son's continued health; in him his wife has had dinner with them and he wishes he could eat some of  his mother's good cakes and pies. He writes Richmond, VA has not fallen.


Item 56:  Letter to Dear Brother gust, May 7, 1862, from ?. 
Re: The letter is illegible.


Item 57:  Letter to Dear son, May 8, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: His father seems to admonish him for not taking his advice in that he should have joined the Volunteer Army.


Item 58:  Letter to Dear Brother, May 18, 1862, from Lizzie Mechling. 
Re: Expresses concern over the delay in receiving mail; his wife wants him to ask for a discharge; his wife has raised tomatoes and wishes he was home to enjoy them, and other news from home.


Item 59:  A muster roll for A. A. Mechling, 1864, for leave due to promotion to Major, disability and discharge.


Item 60:  Western Union Telegram from Sioux City, Iowa, January 18, 1876, to J. H. Mechling, informing him his father (A. A. Mechling) died this morning of heart disease.


Item 61:  Various correspondence concerning Susan Mechling's application for a pension from her late husband's Civil War service.


Item 62:  Various correspondence concerning cemetery lots, monument, etc.


Item 63:  Correspondence from Pennsylvania Rail Road Co. regarding the shipment of household items.  


Item 64:  Letter to Dear Father and Mother, May, 1917, from Edward A. Mechling, informing them he had volunteered for Officers Training Camp at Fort Sheridan.


Item 65:  Letter to Dear Father, April 9, 1862, from Jonas Henry Mechling. 
Re: Writes his father must come home as they can no longer do without him; the garden is growing well; Ed is so lazy his mother has to whip him to get him to do anything.


Item 66:  Letter to Dear Brother, March 7, 1862, from wife and sister. 
Re: They enclose paper and stamps as they know they are scarce for him.


Item 67:  Letter to Dear Brother Gust, from Brother ?. 
Re: Thankful he is safe in Nashville, TN.


Item 68:  Letter to Dear Son, March 18, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: Cannot understand why he does not get their letters as they receive his quickly; none of the Greensburg men have lost their life yet.


Item 69:  Letter to Dear Wife, March 22, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He is 32 miles south of Nashville, 30 miles from the Alabama line in a town called Springhill. He will bring some cotton and other seeds home for them to see; bridges and roads have to be repaired as they march as Rebels burned them; believes the war will soon be over as Rebels are going home and some have said they will not fire at the Union soldiers.


Item 70:  Letter to Dear Wife, March 27, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He is 35 miles south of Nashville; there are many Union soldiers and as they advance the Rebels retreat; Union soldiers guard the good houses and crops so that they will not be destroyed. He has only pork, beans and hard crackers to eat.


Item 71:  Letter to Dear Son, March 27, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: As in previous letters he admonishes his son for joining the army rather than the volunteers; regrets he has not received his commission; the grain fields at home promise a good harvest.


Item 72:  Letter to ?, no date, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: This is a P. S. that is lost from the rest of the letter. Corn and blackberries will soon be ready to eat but he is afraid to eat them. List the names of two soldiers who were discharged.


Item 73:  Letter to Dear Wife, April 3, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is 10 miles south of Columbia, TN. 
The weather is warm and dry; New Orleans has fallen to the Union; and if TN were not a slave state he would like to live here.


Item 74:  Letter to Dear Wife, April 9, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is Savanna, TN, and the worst fight was fought 6 miles away in Pittsburg where hundreds of men were killed.


Item 75:  Letter to Dear Wife, April 12, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: For three days they have been burying the dead from the battle with 500 more to bury; he has not changed clothes or taken them off in two weeks and they sleep in houses made of sticks and brush.


Item 76:  Letter to Dear Brother, April 12, from sister Lizzie. 
Re: Disappointed he has not gotten his commission yet; his family is well and want him to come home.


Item 77:  Letter to Dear Brother, April 19, 1862, from wife and sister. 
Re: They believe the war will last a long time; they will send stamps; it makes them sad the hardships he bears.


Item 78:  Letter to Dear Wife, April 24, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Describes a battle his regiment fought on their march to Corinth killing a good many Rebels.  


Item 79:  Letter to Dear Friend, May 5, 1862, from D. H. ?. 
Re: He writes from a hospital in Hamburg, TN. He has good quarters, plenty to eat and he requests a discharge.


Item 80:  Letter to Dear Brother Gust, May 7, 1862, from your affectionate wife and sister Lizzie. 
Re: Sympathizing with him for the hardships he endures; Susan ask him not to reenlist and to come home; his son wants to know if he still has the dog.


Item 81:  Letter to Dear Wife, May 7, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is near Corinth, MS, the Union army is 200.000 strong with many cannons; Rebel soldiers seem unwilling to fight; request she seek help to reclaim debt he is owed; he sleeps on the ground with only brush to cover him.


Item 82:  Letter to Dear Wife, May 8, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: They have not heard or seen Rebel soldiers near Corinth, MS in sometime, and he believes the fight is nearly over; he will request a furlough. He would not have left home if he had thought he would have been gone so long.


Item 83:  Letter to Dear Brother, May 9, 1862, from wife[Susan] and Sister[Lizzie] 
Re: They are concerned with the hardships he bears and they would send money to him  to buy some boots if they thought he would receive it. They do not understand why he does not receive his pay. Please send another lock of hair as they did not receive the first one.


Item 84:  Letter to Dear Brother, June 5, 1862, from Lizzie. 
Re: Worries how hard he works building and repairing roads and bridges burned out by the Rebels; the squash seeds you sent are up; the trees around your house have grown so much in the 8 months you have been gone.


Item 85:  Letter to Dear Wife, June 28, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is Bear Creek, Alabama, and there seem to be no rebels around; they are making delicious pies using milk and butter that they buy from negroes who come into camp.


Item 86:  Letter to Dear Son, June 23, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: His father believes the Abolitionist started and have prolonged the war.  


Item 87:  Letter to Dear Brother, July 1, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He is sick and going down fast and fears he will die if he does not get home so someone can take care of him.


Item 88:  Letter to Dear Wife, July 3, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: This letter is faded and illegible.


Item 89:  Note to Dear Van, July 4, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: Inquiring if his appointment is on hand and a yes response that his appointment is alright.  


Item 90:  Letter to Dear Brother, July 9, 1862, from ?. 
Re: He tells him about the vegetables they have in the garden; Ed inquires again about the dog and they want him home.


Item 91:  Letter to Dear Son, July 10, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: Wheat and hay are ready to be harvested but the fields are too wet; vegetables and fruit are plentiful; the prospect for the war ending soon is poor.


Item 92:  Letter to Dear Brother Gust, July 10, 1862, from Jonas S. M. 
Re: The Battle of Richmond has lasted 7 days with Rebel losses at 70,000 wounded or killed, and Union losses at 10 to 20 thousand.


Item 93:  Letter to Dear Wife, July 11, 1862, unsigned [A.A. Mechling] 
Re: He worries that she may need money and he has no way to get it to her.  


Item 94:  Letter to Dear Wife, July 19, 1862, unsigned [A. A. Mechling] 
Re: He is promoted to Lieutenant and he will be appointed to the recruiting service in PA and will be paid over $100. per month.


Item 95:  Letter to Dear Son, July 23, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: His father knows his son's health is not good; tells him the Union Army is trying to recruit more soldiers in order to crush the rebellion.


Item 96:  Letter to ? Mechling, July 23, 1862, from ?Rogers. 
Re: The appointment has been made and I am sure you have received it by this time. The appointment was made July 20, 1862.


Item 97:  Letter to Dear Brother, July 30, 1862, from Susan and sister Lizzie. Re: They have heard he is sick; speak of the fruit and vegetables in the garden; they are pleased over his appointment.


Item 98:  Letter to Dear Wife, August 1, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is Athens, AL and he is marching toward Nashville; he has it in his power to resign and come home and he seeks her advice. He is a commissioned officer.


Item 99:  Letter to Dear Wife, August 14, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He enjoys drilling the soldiers; a soldier is returning to Greensburg and he will bring you a letter plus some other things; he has a servant now that is a commissioned officer.


Item 100:  Letter to Dear Brother, August 20, from Susan and sister Lizzie. 
Re: they would like to have him home but would not like to see him leave the office he now holds.

 

Box 3


Item 101:  Letter to Dear Brother, August 22, 1862, from Brother Jonas. 
Re: Congratulating him on his commission.


Item 102:  Letter to Dear Son, August 23, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: Recommends he put white oak leaves plus a wet cloth in his hat to keep cool; 600,000 more troops have been called and he wishes this awful war would end. He advises his son to treat prisoners kindly and to live by the Golden Rule.


Item 103:  Letter to Dear Father, August 26, 1862, from Jonas Mechling. 
Re: Telling him how happy he is to get the gun he sent and he wishes he were home so they could go shooting.


Item 104:  Letter to Dear Brother, August 28, 1862, from sister Lizzie. 
Re: Mentions several soldier's names home on furlough. This letter is dim and difficult to read.


Item 105:  Letter to Dear Wife, August 2?, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He assures her he is well; describes a sudden move to escape the Rebels; explains he has enough money to support them plus save.


Item 106:  Letter to Dear Wife, September 8, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is Nashville but will be going to Kentucky. He will send his photograph; tell Lizzie I have plenty of thread and buttons.


Item 107:  Letter to Dear Brother, September 15, 1862, from Jonas. 
Re: Sorry that his frequent letters do not reach him; gives names and addresses of relatives in Washington and Nashville for him to visit if he has the opportunity.


Item 108:  Letter to Dear Wife, September 19, 1862, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is Bowling Green, Kentucky and he is in command of his regiments' train plus 150 men. He complains how expensive things are such as a sword costing $25., butter $.50 a pound and eggs $.30 for a dozen.


Item 109:  Letter to Dear Brother, October 21, 1862, from WHM. 
Re: Expresses sympathy over his brother's health problems.


Item 110:  Letter to Dear Father, October 26, 1862, from Jonas H. Mechling. 
Re: I do not want you to leave Louisville, and I want you to get a place so we can come there. I would like a ride in the cars (train).


Item 111:  Letter is faded and illegible.


Item 112:  Letter to Dear Son, October 30, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: He knows of his ill health, wishes he could be reassigned and he fears he cannot endure another winter. Many are being drafted in Pennsylvania and he wonders who will raise the food if all the men are taken. There is much sadness as people mourn the loss of loved ones.  


Item 113:  Letter to Dear Son, November 19, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: He regrets his health has not improved and he had to resign; your daughter Lizzie is not well (diphtheria) but the others in your family have recovered.


Item 114:  Letter to A. A. Mechling, November 24, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: He disapproves of General McLelland and The Emancipation Proclamation fearing it will operate against us.


Item 115:  Letter to Dear Son, December 3, 1862, from J. Mechling. 
Re: He is sorry that the bad news of his child's illness has made his health worse, but she is mending slowly with high hopes of recovery. There is much sickness in the county during these troublesome times.


Item 116:  Letter to Dear Brother, December 23, 1861, from sister Lizzie. 
Re: His son, Jonas, is very ill and they all wish he would come home.

 

Item 117:  Letter to Dear Husband, December 27, 1861, from Sussanna. 
Re: Jonas is better and out of danger. She urges him if he becomes ill to come home and not go to the hospital. A family in Greensburg has lost three children to diphtheria.


Item 118:  Letter to Dear Brother, December 29, 1861, from sister Lizzie. 
Re: Requesting a lock of his hair and a picture.


Item 119:  Letter to Dear Wife and children, 1862, from A. A. Mechlling. 
Re: He will keep her informed of his location so she can follow him on the map; he will bring some nice things home; he expects to make his mark in the army defending my government and please do not discourage me.


Item 120:  Letter to A. A. Mechling, no date, from Jonas Henry Mechling. 
Re: Names the people who came to help butcher the hogs that produced a large amount of meat and sausage.


Item 121:  Letter to Respected Sir, 1862, from John L. ?. 
Re: He is writing for his brother inquiring about his soldier friends, the particulars of the camp and his missing pay.


Item 122:  Letter to Dear Husband, no date, from wife (Susan). 
Re. The letter is difficult to read but it seems she is asking him to come home.


Item 123:  Letter with no greeting or date, signed A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is near Nashville where he sees many beautiful farms and flower gardens. The farmers are all off serving in the Rebel Army.


Item 124:  Letter with no greeting or date signed A. A. Mechling. 
Re: He writes of officers drinking whiskey in which many have been reported as it is forbidden.


Item 125:  Letter to my dear husband, no date and unsigned. 
Re: His wife is asking that he send his money home as she needs it to run the house and to raise the children.


Item 126:  Letter with no greeting or date signed sister Lizzie. 
Re: Men who are in debt to A. A. Mechling refuse to pay his wife Susan when she asks for the money owed.


Item 127:  Letter with no greeting or date signed A. P. Mechling, your cousin. 
Re: He tells the boys about the red skin Indians with nice ponies,  and he will bring presents when he sees them.


Item 128:  Letter with no greeting or date signed sister Liz. 
Re: Letter illegible.


Item 129:  Letter with no greeting or date signed A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is near Corinth, MS. He says some Rebels have given themselves up as prisoners declaring they will not fight again.


Item 130:  Letter with no greeting, date or signature. 
Re: This seems to be giving the name and location of a deserter, giving names of neighbors who can supply information and the times to come.


Item 131:  Letter to My Dear Wife, December 18, ?, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is Washington, DC; he is requesting leave to come home; he has captured a mule and he hopes to bring him home.


Item 132:  Letter with no greeting, 1861, from A. A. Mechling. 
Re: His location is Nashville which he describes as paradise. He believes the war will soon be over.